4 Lessons on Adoption From 90’s Rock

With touching hits like Iris and With Arms Wide Open the 90’s taught us how to feel. After I was hit with a nostalgia bug, I wondered if rock’s golden age could teach us anything about adoption, and with a liberal approach at original intent (everything will all be completely out of context) and a little bit of imagination, I found 4 lessons from classic 90’s rock songs on adoption. So, without further ado, feast on these memory pops.

1. Linger By The Cranberries

Whew! If that doesn’t pull on your nostalgia muscles, nothing will.

The Cranberries made life more poetic and enjoyable. They also helped you through those times you felt as if you were being dangled from a finger. Those times when you felt like someone was letting you linger.

Moral of the story: Sometimes the adoption process takes time. If you are pursing adoption, it’s safe to bet your future child has you wrapped around her finger. She will be worth the lingering.

2. The Distance By Cake

This is just a great pump-you-up song for parents in general. Listen to it while picturing dirty diapers and soccer practices, you’ll see what I mean.

Moral of the story: Parenting is hard and you have to work at it; even when the lights are off, when the arena (is) empty… and the sun has gone down, the moon has gone up, and long ago somebody left with the cup.

3. My Sacrifice By Creed

What’s a blog on rock music without Creed? Regardless of how much you bash them now, back in the day, you couldn’t live without One Last Breath. Creed was awesome, and My Sacrifice tugged on the heart strings. Just try to listen to it without getting a healthy dose of the feels.

When you are with me, I’m free
I’m careless, I believe
Above all the others we’ll fly
This brings tears to my eyes
My sacrifice

Moral of the story: Sometimes sacrifice pays off. Adoption will demand some sacrifices. It will demand financial sacrifice, as well as the sacrifice of your time and attention. Beyond that, parenting will knock off some of your sleeping hours and it will require an emotional commitment. At the end of the day, the kid will be worth it. Just ask Creed.